Project 1

Due: Wednesday, June 28 by 11:59pm
Objectives: Data Analysis
Grade: 20% of final

This assignment requires you to practice processing, visualizing, and analyzing data. Follow these steps:

  1. Begin by learning about the e-waste problem by reading about it at Electronics Take Back Coalition, STEP Initiative or the United Nations University. Once you have a general understanding of what e-waste is and why it’s a problem, read carefully the primary documents that we’ll use to source data: ETBC’s Facts & Figures, STEP’s World Map, and the UNU’s Monitor Report. Those sources will provide a starting point for in-class discussion. Feel free to use additional sources for your final infographic—just be sure to document your research along the way.
  2. Collect the information by entering it into a spreadsheet. I recommend you use a Google spreadsheet, but you can upload .csv, .tsv, .txt, or .kml files later if you prefer to work on a local drive rather than online.
  3. Once you have a data set organized into a document, start playing around with different visualizations, from basic infographics to more complex map overlays if you have geospatial data. Not all graphs, tables, or maps will work with all data sets, and you may have to filter or aggregate specific subsets of data to get useful results. Keep trying different options until you find results that help you better understand the data. Revise the spreadsheet if need be. Save three or four configurations that provide useful results.
  4. Using your spreadsheets and early visualizations as a starting point, begin to create an infographic using Piktocharts. The goal will be to make an argument for or against federal e-waste legislation. But as you get started, ask some brainstorming questions: What do your visualizations tell you that the original reports did not? What do they tell you that you didn’t know in advance? How do they begin to make sense of the e-waste problem that they document? The infographic does not need to answer those questions, but those questions should help you figure out what story you want to tell about e-waste. Use the spreadsheets to create charts or graphs that fill out your infographic’s narrative. Be sure to cite your sources at the bottom of your infographic.
  5. When you have a complete infographic, save it as an image file (JPG or PNG). Email the file to me as an attachment. Title the file using this form: LastnameFirstinitial_Data.pdf.

 

Online Resources

 


 

Infographic Rubric

Inadequate Adequate Outstanding
 

 

Research

 

Includes fewer than two sources or is missing citations.

 

 

Includes two credible sources with citations.

 

 

Includes two or more credible sources with clear citations.

 

 

 

 

Data Analysis

 

Lacks either visual or expository account of data; fails to explain e-waste as a social or technological phenomenon.

 

Includes visual and expository account of data; demonstrates something about e-waste as a social or technological phenomenon.

 

 

Includes compelling visual and expository account of data; demonstrates something about e-waste as a social and technological phenomenon.

 

 

 

Design

 

Does not include a variety of aesthetic elements or fails to achieve consistency between them; confusing structure or illegible data visualizations.

 

 

Includes various aesthetic elements while achieving some visual consistency; clearly legible visualizations and overall structure.

 

 

Includes various aesthetic elements while achieving visual consistency; overall structure adds to argument and makes visualizations legible.

 

 

 

Argument

 

Does not make a clear point about e-waste legislation or does not support it with evidence.

 

Makes a clear point about e-waste legislation with evidence that supports claim.

 

 

Makes a clear point about e-waste legislation with evidence showing how e-waste is or is not a political phenomenon in addition to a technological, social, and cultural phenomenon.

 

 

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